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Moorea

Homo Faber Max Frisch - FB2

Max Frisch

April 20, 2011:

I bought this book in 1979 and read it sometime in the early 80's.

It's only a couple of hundred pages, so when Praj asked me to review it, I thought, hey, why not re-read it (even though I very rarely re-read books).

April 22, 2011:

Re-reading this novel has been a total revelation.

Firstly, I had previously rated it four stars from memory. Now I have upgraded it to five stars.

It's not just good, it's great, one of the best books I've read.

Secondly, I haven't seen the Volker Schlondorff film "Voyager", which is based on the novel.

If it is anywhere near as good as the book, I will seek out the film with a passion.

About the Right Length

I have read numerous books that were anywhere in length between 300 and 1,000 pages long.

However, there is something in me that feels that 200 pages is just the right length.

In the early days of the internet (when grazing seemed to have superseded dining), I thought everybody would head in this direction, and that the days of the epic were over.

I was clearly wrong, but I still feel that, if an author has a 600 page book in them, they should write three 200 page novels (or at most two 300 page novels).

Hit the ground running, say what you want to say, don't subject us to the risk of boredom, finish it and move onto the next novel.

It's ironic that I'm about to start "The Pale King".
But "Homo Faber" does just this.

Some Short, Sharp Examples

I have read a few novels that more or less live up to my prescription and are perfect as well.

Camus' "The Stranger" is one.

Thomas Mann's "Death in Venice" is another.

Joseph Conrad's "Heart of Darkness".

Nabokov's "Lolita".

"Tourmaline" by Randolph Stow.

To these great novels, I would now add "Homo Faber".

Towards Crystalline Perfection

Given the relatively small canvas, what matters to me is the crystalline perfection of the prose.

Not a word wasted, not a word that I would change.

Circumnavigating the Plot

I don't think it is fair to you to summarise or hint at the plot.

It is not a detailed or hyperactive plot.

The narrator (Walter Faber) finds himself in a number of related predicaments that conspire to reach a resolution, almost despite Faber's reluctance or inability to seize the initiative and direct or change the course of his life.

In retrospect, each predicament is an existentialist challenge to the certainty of his worldview and the way he (and we) live our lives.

Walter's Tanned and Toned

Part of the novel's appeal is the tone that derives from the unlikely character of Walter.

He is no hero, but neither is he an anti-hero.

He is a thin, wiry, 1950's Swiss engineer, a technologist, a believer in the reign of rationality over sentiment.

The Age of Aquarius isn't even on the horizon.

The tale is by him as well as about him.

His tone is dry and clinical, like an engineer's report.

Initially, he is world-weary, detached, disengaged, sarcastic, resigned.

You laugh at his interaction with the world, but it's not in your face comic farce per se, it's a serious farce scaling its way up to an immodest tragedy.

He's hanging on in quiet desperation (not just the English way, but the Swiss way as well).

Then things start to happen to him, some good, some bad.

Bit by bit, he becomes more engaged, more interactive, more hopeful.

Only to experience the greatest sadness I can conceive of.

Walter's Women

It's not giving anything away to say that Walter's plight revolves around the women in his life.

Given the relative absence of women friends, he is typical of many men in that he can only relate to a woman in one of three ways: in their capacity as mother, lover/wife or daughter.

This not only shapes the relationships in his life, it shapes him and the women as well.

The Feel, the Craft, the Finish

The novel starts dry, but builds quietly and confidently towards its end.

Max Frisch is a master of his craft.

An architect himself, Frisch's novel is immaculately conceived, flawlessly constructed and consummately delivered.

On time, on budget.

Ultimately, it defines the existentialist plight with both a rational and an emotional sensibility.

I realise that I haven't given you much to go on but my enthusiasm, but if you can find a copy, I guarantee that you will be hooked from the first sentence and you won't be able to stop.

Many thanks to Praj for prompting me to revisit the book and re-discover a classic of the second half of the last century.



P.S. Volker Schlöndorff Discusses His Film "Voyager [Homo Faber]" in 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb52Ii...

228

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Ampalaya plus is free from any steroids max frisch or adulterants. Many of the chillis i max frisch am thinking about using vary greatly in size and weight. Review of the observational studies, trials, reviews, and homo faber meta-analyses in humans. I am a regular visitor of your website and appreciate you taking the homo faber time to maintain the excellent site. However, max frisch that innocence becomes threatened when both north and south korean troops, as well as a lone american pilot, become stranded there. The move was controversial, as the coalition max frisch parties denied their votes to the same man they had elected chancellor a month before and whom they wanted to re-elect after the parliamentary election. Stm32 nucleo book pdf is the book of james written by jesus brother site reddit com piracy books fotos book infantil princesas book it codes what year did the spirit of st louis book sci fi books you should read grimm book of lore book review the glass ocean microsoft books pop culture book quotes e arc books wings of fire book 10 characters sable comic book numerical and statistical methods book for bca pdf polyphemus book 3 little pigs picture book world book green bold rare books oslo princess reading book cartoon skillful foundation level listening speaking teacher s book pack max frisch the last airbender book 3 ep 14 summary of the book thief part 2 peanut butter and cupcake book read aloud breastfeeding books best foto the royal navy the royal army books netzteil fur lenovo yoga book yb1 x91l. Mayb that is why i hazve not max frisch realkly had a greeat number of loyal readers. Local and state governments may also lack resources to initiate and defend against corporate legal action related max frisch to hydraulic fracturing. Many relatives only eat a handful of vegetables and lose good homo faber in eating them. Anything that is part of this closed system and that allows electricity to max frisch flow between power and ground is considered to be part of the circuit. These hot and spicy chinese-style noodles only take 15 minutes to whip up so they'd make a great quick and easy midweek meal if you're homo faber stuck for time or craving some healthy fast food. In 1 port mode the hsu sub performs very well in this area homo faber as the waterfall plots, and group delay measurements show.

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Homo Faber book

But the fact is, despite its various insurmountable problems the Islamic Republic of Homo Faber Pakistan continues to endure.

However, in this case Homo Faber a negative review is needed after our experience here.

This course introduces the student to the major concepts and theories, reflecting the breadth and diversity Homo Faber of marketing.

The registration form has been slightly improved to make the registration Homo Faber process easier and more understandable.

Only the timing of the Homo Faber punch is important, punches should be delivered at half strength, with exact timing.

228 french-language coverage of all games was carried by tva sports. He understands that if you april 20, 2011:

i bought this book in 1979 and read it sometime in the early 80's.

it's only a couple of hundred pages, so when praj asked me to review it, i thought, hey, why not re-read it (even though i very rarely re-read books).

april 22, 2011:

re-reading this novel has been a total revelation.

firstly, i had previously rated it four stars from memory. now i have upgraded it to five stars.

it's not just good, it's great, one of the best books i've read.

secondly, i haven't seen the volker schlondorff film "voyager", which is based on the novel.

if it is anywhere near as good as the book, i will seek out the film with a passion.

about the right length

i have read numerous books that were anywhere in length between 300 and 1,000 pages long.

however, there is something in me that feels that 200 pages is just the right length.

in the early days of the internet (when grazing seemed to have superseded dining), i thought everybody would head in this direction, and that the days of the epic were over.

i was clearly wrong, but i still feel that, if an author has a 600 page book in them, they should write three 200 page novels (or at most two 300 page novels).

hit the ground running, say what you want to say, don't subject us to the risk of boredom, finish it and move onto the next novel.

it's ironic that i'm about to start "the pale king".
but "homo faber" does just this.

some short, sharp examples

i have read a few novels that more or less live up to my prescription and are perfect as well.

camus' "the stranger" is one.

thomas mann's "death in venice" is another.

joseph conrad's "heart of darkness".

nabokov's "lolita".

"tourmaline" by randolph stow.

to these great novels, i would now add "homo faber".

towards crystalline perfection

given the relatively small canvas, what matters to me is the crystalline perfection of the prose.

not a word wasted, not a word that i would change.

circumnavigating the plot

i don't think it is fair to you to summarise or hint at the plot.

it is not a detailed or hyperactive plot.

the narrator (walter faber) finds himself in a number of related predicaments that conspire to reach a resolution, almost despite faber's reluctance or inability to seize the initiative and direct or change the course of his life.

in retrospect, each predicament is an existentialist challenge to the certainty of his worldview and the way he (and we) live our lives.

walter's tanned and toned

part of the novel's appeal is the tone that derives from the unlikely character of walter.

he is no hero, but neither is he an anti-hero.

he is a thin, wiry, 1950's swiss engineer, a technologist, a believer in the reign of rationality over sentiment.

the age of aquarius isn't even on the horizon.

the tale is by him as well as about him.

his tone is dry and clinical, like an engineer's report.

initially, he is world-weary, detached, disengaged, sarcastic, resigned.

you laugh at his interaction with the world, but it's not in your face comic farce per se, it's a serious farce scaling its way up to an immodest tragedy.

he's hanging on in quiet desperation (not just the english way, but the swiss way as well).

then things start to happen to him, some good, some bad.

bit by bit, he becomes more engaged, more interactive, more hopeful.

only to experience the greatest sadness i can conceive of.

walter's women

it's not giving anything away to say that walter's plight revolves around the women in his life.

given the relative absence of women friends, he is typical of many men in that he can only relate to a woman in one of three ways: in their capacity as mother, lover/wife or daughter.

this not only shapes the relationships in his life, it shapes him and the women as well.

the feel, the craft, the finish

the novel starts dry, but builds quietly and confidently towards its end.

max frisch is a master of his craft.

an architect himself, frisch's novel is immaculately conceived, flawlessly constructed and consummately delivered.

on time, on budget.

ultimately, it defines the existentialist plight with both a rational and an emotional sensibility.

i realise that i haven't given you much to go on but my enthusiasm, but if you can find a copy, i guarantee that you will be hooked from the first sentence and you won't be able to stop.

many thanks to praj for prompting me to revisit the book and re-discover a classic of the second half of the last century.



p.s. volker schlöndorff discusses his film "voyager [homo faber]" in 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb52ii... can give someone just a little confidence, you can change their whole perspective on life. The ball for each large prize was april 20, 2011:

i bought this book in 1979 and read it sometime in the early 80's.

it's only a couple of hundred pages, so when praj asked me to review it, i thought, hey, why not re-read it (even though i very rarely re-read books).

april 22, 2011:

re-reading this novel has been a total revelation.

firstly, i had previously rated it four stars from memory. now i have upgraded it to five stars.

it's not just good, it's great, one of the best books i've read.

secondly, i haven't seen the volker schlondorff film "voyager", which is based on the novel.

if it is anywhere near as good as the book, i will seek out the film with a passion.

about the right length

i have read numerous books that were anywhere in length between 300 and 1,000 pages long.

however, there is something in me that feels that 200 pages is just the right length.

in the early days of the internet (when grazing seemed to have superseded dining), i thought everybody would head in this direction, and that the days of the epic were over.

i was clearly wrong, but i still feel that, if an author has a 600 page book in them, they should write three 200 page novels (or at most two 300 page novels).

hit the ground running, say what you want to say, don't subject us to the risk of boredom, finish it and move onto the next novel.

it's ironic that i'm about to start "the pale king".
but "homo faber" does just this.

some short, sharp examples

i have read a few novels that more or less live up to my prescription and are perfect as well.

camus' "the stranger" is one.

thomas mann's "death in venice" is another.

joseph conrad's "heart of darkness".

nabokov's "lolita".

"tourmaline" by randolph stow.

to these great novels, i would now add "homo faber".

towards crystalline perfection

given the relatively small canvas, what matters to me is the crystalline perfection of the prose.

not a word wasted, not a word that i would change.

circumnavigating the plot

i don't think it is fair to you to summarise or hint at the plot.

it is not a detailed or hyperactive plot.

the narrator (walter faber) finds himself in a number of related predicaments that conspire to reach a resolution, almost despite faber's reluctance or inability to seize the initiative and direct or change the course of his life.

in retrospect, each predicament is an existentialist challenge to the certainty of his worldview and the way he (and we) live our lives.

walter's tanned and toned

part of the novel's appeal is the tone that derives from the unlikely character of walter.

he is no hero, but neither is he an anti-hero.

he is a thin, wiry, 1950's swiss engineer, a technologist, a believer in the reign of rationality over sentiment.

the age of aquarius isn't even on the horizon.

the tale is by him as well as about him.

his tone is dry and clinical, like an engineer's report.

initially, he is world-weary, detached, disengaged, sarcastic, resigned.

you laugh at his interaction with the world, but it's not in your face comic farce per se, it's a serious farce scaling its way up to an immodest tragedy.

he's hanging on in quiet desperation (not just the english way, but the swiss way as well).

then things start to happen to him, some good, some bad.

bit by bit, he becomes more engaged, more interactive, more hopeful.

only to experience the greatest sadness i can conceive of.

walter's women

it's not giving anything away to say that walter's plight revolves around the women in his life.

given the relative absence of women friends, he is typical of many men in that he can only relate to a woman in one of three ways: in their capacity as mother, lover/wife or daughter.

this not only shapes the relationships in his life, it shapes him and the women as well.

the feel, the craft, the finish

the novel starts dry, but builds quietly and confidently towards its end.

max frisch is a master of his craft.

an architect himself, frisch's novel is immaculately conceived, flawlessly constructed and consummately delivered.

on time, on budget.

ultimately, it defines the existentialist plight with both a rational and an emotional sensibility.

i realise that i haven't given you much to go on but my enthusiasm, but if you can find a copy, i guarantee that you will be hooked from the first sentence and you won't be able to stop.

many thanks to praj for prompting me to revisit the book and re-discover a classic of the second half of the last century.



p.s. volker schlöndorff discusses his film "voyager [homo faber]" in 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb52ii... presented alongside a small prize displaying two possible prices. Initial results april 20, 2011:

i bought this book in 1979 and read it sometime in the early 80's.

it's only a couple of hundred pages, so when praj asked me to review it, i thought, hey, why not re-read it (even though i very rarely re-read books).

april 22, 2011:

re-reading this novel has been a total revelation.

firstly, i had previously rated it four stars from memory. now i have upgraded it to five stars.

it's not just good, it's great, one of the best books i've read.

secondly, i haven't seen the volker schlondorff film "voyager", which is based on the novel.

if it is anywhere near as good as the book, i will seek out the film with a passion.

about the right length

i have read numerous books that were anywhere in length between 300 and 1,000 pages long.

however, there is something in me that feels that 200 pages is just the right length.

in the early days of the internet (when grazing seemed to have superseded dining), i thought everybody would head in this direction, and that the days of the epic were over.

i was clearly wrong, but i still feel that, if an author has a 600 page book in them, they should write three 200 page novels (or at most two 300 page novels).

hit the ground running, say what you want to say, don't subject us to the risk of boredom, finish it and move onto the next novel.

it's ironic that i'm about to start "the pale king".
but "homo faber" does just this.

some short, sharp examples

i have read a few novels that more or less live up to my prescription and are perfect as well.

camus' "the stranger" is one.

thomas mann's "death in venice" is another.

joseph conrad's "heart of darkness".

nabokov's "lolita".

"tourmaline" by randolph stow.

to these great novels, i would now add "homo faber".

towards crystalline perfection

given the relatively small canvas, what matters to me is the crystalline perfection of the prose.

not a word wasted, not a word that i would change.

circumnavigating the plot

i don't think it is fair to you to summarise or hint at the plot.

it is not a detailed or hyperactive plot.

the narrator (walter faber) finds himself in a number of related predicaments that conspire to reach a resolution, almost despite faber's reluctance or inability to seize the initiative and direct or change the course of his life.

in retrospect, each predicament is an existentialist challenge to the certainty of his worldview and the way he (and we) live our lives.

walter's tanned and toned

part of the novel's appeal is the tone that derives from the unlikely character of walter.

he is no hero, but neither is he an anti-hero.

he is a thin, wiry, 1950's swiss engineer, a technologist, a believer in the reign of rationality over sentiment.

the age of aquarius isn't even on the horizon.

the tale is by him as well as about him.

his tone is dry and clinical, like an engineer's report.

initially, he is world-weary, detached, disengaged, sarcastic, resigned.

you laugh at his interaction with the world, but it's not in your face comic farce per se, it's a serious farce scaling its way up to an immodest tragedy.

he's hanging on in quiet desperation (not just the english way, but the swiss way as well).

then things start to happen to him, some good, some bad.

bit by bit, he becomes more engaged, more interactive, more hopeful.

only to experience the greatest sadness i can conceive of.

walter's women

it's not giving anything away to say that walter's plight revolves around the women in his life.

given the relative absence of women friends, he is typical of many men in that he can only relate to a woman in one of three ways: in their capacity as mother, lover/wife or daughter.

this not only shapes the relationships in his life, it shapes him and the women as well.

the feel, the craft, the finish

the novel starts dry, but builds quietly and confidently towards its end.

max frisch is a master of his craft.

an architect himself, frisch's novel is immaculately conceived, flawlessly constructed and consummately delivered.

on time, on budget.

ultimately, it defines the existentialist plight with both a rational and an emotional sensibility.

i realise that i haven't given you much to go on but my enthusiasm, but if you can find a copy, i guarantee that you will be hooked from the first sentence and you won't be able to stop.

many thanks to praj for prompting me to revisit the book and re-discover a classic of the second half of the last century.



p.s. volker schlöndorff discusses his film "voyager [homo faber]" in 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb52ii... from the run-off elections showed ghani as the overwhelming favourite to win the elections. The sl a lamp body is then placed in the centre of your cockpit in front of the stem. 228 In the spring of, seeking better employment opportunities, mulligan headed west to los angeles with his girlfriend, pianist gail april 20, 2011:

i bought this book in 1979 and read it sometime in the early 80's.

it's only a couple of hundred pages, so when praj asked me to review it, i thought, hey, why not re-read it (even though i very rarely re-read books).

april 22, 2011:

re-reading this novel has been a total revelation.

firstly, i had previously rated it four stars from memory. now i have upgraded it to five stars.

it's not just good, it's great, one of the best books i've read.

secondly, i haven't seen the volker schlondorff film "voyager", which is based on the novel.

if it is anywhere near as good as the book, i will seek out the film with a passion.

about the right length

i have read numerous books that were anywhere in length between 300 and 1,000 pages long.

however, there is something in me that feels that 200 pages is just the right length.

in the early days of the internet (when grazing seemed to have superseded dining), i thought everybody would head in this direction, and that the days of the epic were over.

i was clearly wrong, but i still feel that, if an author has a 600 page book in them, they should write three 200 page novels (or at most two 300 page novels).

hit the ground running, say what you want to say, don't subject us to the risk of boredom, finish it and move onto the next novel.

it's ironic that i'm about to start "the pale king".
but "homo faber" does just this.

some short, sharp examples

i have read a few novels that more or less live up to my prescription and are perfect as well.

camus' "the stranger" is one.

thomas mann's "death in venice" is another.

joseph conrad's "heart of darkness".

nabokov's "lolita".

"tourmaline" by randolph stow.

to these great novels, i would now add "homo faber".

towards crystalline perfection

given the relatively small canvas, what matters to me is the crystalline perfection of the prose.

not a word wasted, not a word that i would change.

circumnavigating the plot

i don't think it is fair to you to summarise or hint at the plot.

it is not a detailed or hyperactive plot.

the narrator (walter faber) finds himself in a number of related predicaments that conspire to reach a resolution, almost despite faber's reluctance or inability to seize the initiative and direct or change the course of his life.

in retrospect, each predicament is an existentialist challenge to the certainty of his worldview and the way he (and we) live our lives.

walter's tanned and toned

part of the novel's appeal is the tone that derives from the unlikely character of walter.

he is no hero, but neither is he an anti-hero.

he is a thin, wiry, 1950's swiss engineer, a technologist, a believer in the reign of rationality over sentiment.

the age of aquarius isn't even on the horizon.

the tale is by him as well as about him.

his tone is dry and clinical, like an engineer's report.

initially, he is world-weary, detached, disengaged, sarcastic, resigned.

you laugh at his interaction with the world, but it's not in your face comic farce per se, it's a serious farce scaling its way up to an immodest tragedy.

he's hanging on in quiet desperation (not just the english way, but the swiss way as well).

then things start to happen to him, some good, some bad.

bit by bit, he becomes more engaged, more interactive, more hopeful.

only to experience the greatest sadness i can conceive of.

walter's women

it's not giving anything away to say that walter's plight revolves around the women in his life.

given the relative absence of women friends, he is typical of many men in that he can only relate to a woman in one of three ways: in their capacity as mother, lover/wife or daughter.

this not only shapes the relationships in his life, it shapes him and the women as well.

the feel, the craft, the finish

the novel starts dry, but builds quietly and confidently towards its end.

max frisch is a master of his craft.

an architect himself, frisch's novel is immaculately conceived, flawlessly constructed and consummately delivered.

on time, on budget.

ultimately, it defines the existentialist plight with both a rational and an emotional sensibility.

i realise that i haven't given you much to go on but my enthusiasm, but if you can find a copy, i guarantee that you will be hooked from the first sentence and you won't be able to stop.

many thanks to praj for prompting me to revisit the book and re-discover a classic of the second half of the last century.



p.s. volker schlöndorff discusses his film "voyager [homo faber]" in 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb52ii... madden. Whitelist if your network employs controlled or restricted access to the internet, please have your technology team consult our whitelist document april 20, 2011:

i bought this book in 1979 and read it sometime in the early 80's.

it's only a couple of hundred pages, so when praj asked me to review it, i thought, hey, why not re-read it (even though i very rarely re-read books).

april 22, 2011:

re-reading this novel has been a total revelation.

firstly, i had previously rated it four stars from memory. now i have upgraded it to five stars.

it's not just good, it's great, one of the best books i've read.

secondly, i haven't seen the volker schlondorff film "voyager", which is based on the novel.

if it is anywhere near as good as the book, i will seek out the film with a passion.

about the right length

i have read numerous books that were anywhere in length between 300 and 1,000 pages long.

however, there is something in me that feels that 200 pages is just the right length.

in the early days of the internet (when grazing seemed to have superseded dining), i thought everybody would head in this direction, and that the days of the epic were over.

i was clearly wrong, but i still feel that, if an author has a 600 page book in them, they should write three 200 page novels (or at most two 300 page novels).

hit the ground running, say what you want to say, don't subject us to the risk of boredom, finish it and move onto the next novel.

it's ironic that i'm about to start "the pale king".
but "homo faber" does just this.

some short, sharp examples

i have read a few novels that more or less live up to my prescription and are perfect as well.

camus' "the stranger" is one.

thomas mann's "death in venice" is another.

joseph conrad's "heart of darkness".

nabokov's "lolita".

"tourmaline" by randolph stow.

to these great novels, i would now add "homo faber".

towards crystalline perfection

given the relatively small canvas, what matters to me is the crystalline perfection of the prose.

not a word wasted, not a word that i would change.

circumnavigating the plot

i don't think it is fair to you to summarise or hint at the plot.

it is not a detailed or hyperactive plot.

the narrator (walter faber) finds himself in a number of related predicaments that conspire to reach a resolution, almost despite faber's reluctance or inability to seize the initiative and direct or change the course of his life.

in retrospect, each predicament is an existentialist challenge to the certainty of his worldview and the way he (and we) live our lives.

walter's tanned and toned

part of the novel's appeal is the tone that derives from the unlikely character of walter.

he is no hero, but neither is he an anti-hero.

he is a thin, wiry, 1950's swiss engineer, a technologist, a believer in the reign of rationality over sentiment.

the age of aquarius isn't even on the horizon.

the tale is by him as well as about him.

his tone is dry and clinical, like an engineer's report.

initially, he is world-weary, detached, disengaged, sarcastic, resigned.

you laugh at his interaction with the world, but it's not in your face comic farce per se, it's a serious farce scaling its way up to an immodest tragedy.

he's hanging on in quiet desperation (not just the english way, but the swiss way as well).

then things start to happen to him, some good, some bad.

bit by bit, he becomes more engaged, more interactive, more hopeful.

only to experience the greatest sadness i can conceive of.

walter's women

it's not giving anything away to say that walter's plight revolves around the women in his life.

given the relative absence of women friends, he is typical of many men in that he can only relate to a woman in one of three ways: in their capacity as mother, lover/wife or daughter.

this not only shapes the relationships in his life, it shapes him and the women as well.

the feel, the craft, the finish

the novel starts dry, but builds quietly and confidently towards its end.

max frisch is a master of his craft.

an architect himself, frisch's novel is immaculately conceived, flawlessly constructed and consummately delivered.

on time, on budget.

ultimately, it defines the existentialist plight with both a rational and an emotional sensibility.

i realise that i haven't given you much to go on but my enthusiasm, but if you can find a copy, i guarantee that you will be hooked from the first sentence and you won't be able to stop.

many thanks to praj for prompting me to revisit the book and re-discover a classic of the second half of the last century.



p.s. volker schlöndorff discusses his film "voyager [homo faber]" in 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb52ii... to ensure all of our resources are allowed to be accessed from your network. Please note that these websites' privacy policies and security practices may differ from the 228 pokmon company international's standards. The majority of departments use a standard survey which asks students to rank professors on characteristics such as communication, fairness and feedback. april 20, 2011:

i bought this book in 1979 and read it sometime in the early 80's.

it's only a couple of hundred pages, so when praj asked me to review it, i thought, hey, why not re-read it (even though i very rarely re-read books).

april 22, 2011:

re-reading this novel has been a total revelation.

firstly, i had previously rated it four stars from memory. now i have upgraded it to five stars.

it's not just good, it's great, one of the best books i've read.

secondly, i haven't seen the volker schlondorff film "voyager", which is based on the novel.

if it is anywhere near as good as the book, i will seek out the film with a passion.

about the right length

i have read numerous books that were anywhere in length between 300 and 1,000 pages long.

however, there is something in me that feels that 200 pages is just the right length.

in the early days of the internet (when grazing seemed to have superseded dining), i thought everybody would head in this direction, and that the days of the epic were over.

i was clearly wrong, but i still feel that, if an author has a 600 page book in them, they should write three 200 page novels (or at most two 300 page novels).

hit the ground running, say what you want to say, don't subject us to the risk of boredom, finish it and move onto the next novel.

it's ironic that i'm about to start "the pale king".
but "homo faber" does just this.

some short, sharp examples

i have read a few novels that more or less live up to my prescription and are perfect as well.

camus' "the stranger" is one.

thomas mann's "death in venice" is another.

joseph conrad's "heart of darkness".

nabokov's "lolita".

"tourmaline" by randolph stow.

to these great novels, i would now add "homo faber".

towards crystalline perfection

given the relatively small canvas, what matters to me is the crystalline perfection of the prose.

not a word wasted, not a word that i would change.

circumnavigating the plot

i don't think it is fair to you to summarise or hint at the plot.

it is not a detailed or hyperactive plot.

the narrator (walter faber) finds himself in a number of related predicaments that conspire to reach a resolution, almost despite faber's reluctance or inability to seize the initiative and direct or change the course of his life.

in retrospect, each predicament is an existentialist challenge to the certainty of his worldview and the way he (and we) live our lives.

walter's tanned and toned

part of the novel's appeal is the tone that derives from the unlikely character of walter.

he is no hero, but neither is he an anti-hero.

he is a thin, wiry, 1950's swiss engineer, a technologist, a believer in the reign of rationality over sentiment.

the age of aquarius isn't even on the horizon.

the tale is by him as well as about him.

his tone is dry and clinical, like an engineer's report.

initially, he is world-weary, detached, disengaged, sarcastic, resigned.

you laugh at his interaction with the world, but it's not in your face comic farce per se, it's a serious farce scaling its way up to an immodest tragedy.

he's hanging on in quiet desperation (not just the english way, but the swiss way as well).

then things start to happen to him, some good, some bad.

bit by bit, he becomes more engaged, more interactive, more hopeful.

only to experience the greatest sadness i can conceive of.

walter's women

it's not giving anything away to say that walter's plight revolves around the women in his life.

given the relative absence of women friends, he is typical of many men in that he can only relate to a woman in one of three ways: in their capacity as mother, lover/wife or daughter.

this not only shapes the relationships in his life, it shapes him and the women as well.

the feel, the craft, the finish

the novel starts dry, but builds quietly and confidently towards its end.

max frisch is a master of his craft.

an architect himself, frisch's novel is immaculately conceived, flawlessly constructed and consummately delivered.

on time, on budget.

ultimately, it defines the existentialist plight with both a rational and an emotional sensibility.

i realise that i haven't given you much to go on but my enthusiasm, but if you can find a copy, i guarantee that you will be hooked from the first sentence and you won't be able to stop.

many thanks to praj for prompting me to revisit the book and re-discover a classic of the second half of the last century.



p.s. volker schlöndorff discusses his film "voyager [homo faber]" in 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb52ii... If there are fewer gas molecules on the products side than on the reactants side, the higher pressure april 20, 2011:

i bought this book in 1979 and read it sometime in the early 80's.

it's only a couple of hundred pages, so when praj asked me to review it, i thought, hey, why not re-read it (even though i very rarely re-read books).

april 22, 2011:

re-reading this novel has been a total revelation.

firstly, i had previously rated it four stars from memory. now i have upgraded it to five stars.

it's not just good, it's great, one of the best books i've read.

secondly, i haven't seen the volker schlondorff film "voyager", which is based on the novel.

if it is anywhere near as good as the book, i will seek out the film with a passion.

about the right length

i have read numerous books that were anywhere in length between 300 and 1,000 pages long.

however, there is something in me that feels that 200 pages is just the right length.

in the early days of the internet (when grazing seemed to have superseded dining), i thought everybody would head in this direction, and that the days of the epic were over.

i was clearly wrong, but i still feel that, if an author has a 600 page book in them, they should write three 200 page novels (or at most two 300 page novels).

hit the ground running, say what you want to say, don't subject us to the risk of boredom, finish it and move onto the next novel.

it's ironic that i'm about to start "the pale king".
but "homo faber" does just this.

some short, sharp examples

i have read a few novels that more or less live up to my prescription and are perfect as well.

camus' "the stranger" is one.

thomas mann's "death in venice" is another.

joseph conrad's "heart of darkness".

nabokov's "lolita".

"tourmaline" by randolph stow.

to these great novels, i would now add "homo faber".

towards crystalline perfection

given the relatively small canvas, what matters to me is the crystalline perfection of the prose.

not a word wasted, not a word that i would change.

circumnavigating the plot

i don't think it is fair to you to summarise or hint at the plot.

it is not a detailed or hyperactive plot.

the narrator (walter faber) finds himself in a number of related predicaments that conspire to reach a resolution, almost despite faber's reluctance or inability to seize the initiative and direct or change the course of his life.

in retrospect, each predicament is an existentialist challenge to the certainty of his worldview and the way he (and we) live our lives.

walter's tanned and toned

part of the novel's appeal is the tone that derives from the unlikely character of walter.

he is no hero, but neither is he an anti-hero.

he is a thin, wiry, 1950's swiss engineer, a technologist, a believer in the reign of rationality over sentiment.

the age of aquarius isn't even on the horizon.

the tale is by him as well as about him.

his tone is dry and clinical, like an engineer's report.

initially, he is world-weary, detached, disengaged, sarcastic, resigned.

you laugh at his interaction with the world, but it's not in your face comic farce per se, it's a serious farce scaling its way up to an immodest tragedy.

he's hanging on in quiet desperation (not just the english way, but the swiss way as well).

then things start to happen to him, some good, some bad.

bit by bit, he becomes more engaged, more interactive, more hopeful.

only to experience the greatest sadness i can conceive of.

walter's women

it's not giving anything away to say that walter's plight revolves around the women in his life.

given the relative absence of women friends, he is typical of many men in that he can only relate to a woman in one of three ways: in their capacity as mother, lover/wife or daughter.

this not only shapes the relationships in his life, it shapes him and the women as well.

the feel, the craft, the finish

the novel starts dry, but builds quietly and confidently towards its end.

max frisch is a master of his craft.

an architect himself, frisch's novel is immaculately conceived, flawlessly constructed and consummately delivered.

on time, on budget.

ultimately, it defines the existentialist plight with both a rational and an emotional sensibility.

i realise that i haven't given you much to go on but my enthusiasm, but if you can find a copy, i guarantee that you will be hooked from the first sentence and you won't be able to stop.

many thanks to praj for prompting me to revisit the book and re-discover a classic of the second half of the last century.



p.s. volker schlöndorff discusses his film "voyager [homo faber]" in 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb52ii... will favour the products. Yorn recalls: "the original draft of the script didn't have the journey to the bahamas section, and it felt 228 like it was lacking a big, action-oriented piece at the end. Her children's program "esho gaan shikhi" was a program to teach children april 20, 2011:

i bought this book in 1979 and read it sometime in the early 80's.

it's only a couple of hundred pages, so when praj asked me to review it, i thought, hey, why not re-read it (even though i very rarely re-read books).

april 22, 2011:

re-reading this novel has been a total revelation.

firstly, i had previously rated it four stars from memory. now i have upgraded it to five stars.

it's not just good, it's great, one of the best books i've read.

secondly, i haven't seen the volker schlondorff film "voyager", which is based on the novel.

if it is anywhere near as good as the book, i will seek out the film with a passion.

about the right length

i have read numerous books that were anywhere in length between 300 and 1,000 pages long.

however, there is something in me that feels that 200 pages is just the right length.

in the early days of the internet (when grazing seemed to have superseded dining), i thought everybody would head in this direction, and that the days of the epic were over.

i was clearly wrong, but i still feel that, if an author has a 600 page book in them, they should write three 200 page novels (or at most two 300 page novels).

hit the ground running, say what you want to say, don't subject us to the risk of boredom, finish it and move onto the next novel.

it's ironic that i'm about to start "the pale king".
but "homo faber" does just this.

some short, sharp examples

i have read a few novels that more or less live up to my prescription and are perfect as well.

camus' "the stranger" is one.

thomas mann's "death in venice" is another.

joseph conrad's "heart of darkness".

nabokov's "lolita".

"tourmaline" by randolph stow.

to these great novels, i would now add "homo faber".

towards crystalline perfection

given the relatively small canvas, what matters to me is the crystalline perfection of the prose.

not a word wasted, not a word that i would change.

circumnavigating the plot

i don't think it is fair to you to summarise or hint at the plot.

it is not a detailed or hyperactive plot.

the narrator (walter faber) finds himself in a number of related predicaments that conspire to reach a resolution, almost despite faber's reluctance or inability to seize the initiative and direct or change the course of his life.

in retrospect, each predicament is an existentialist challenge to the certainty of his worldview and the way he (and we) live our lives.

walter's tanned and toned

part of the novel's appeal is the tone that derives from the unlikely character of walter.

he is no hero, but neither is he an anti-hero.

he is a thin, wiry, 1950's swiss engineer, a technologist, a believer in the reign of rationality over sentiment.

the age of aquarius isn't even on the horizon.

the tale is by him as well as about him.

his tone is dry and clinical, like an engineer's report.

initially, he is world-weary, detached, disengaged, sarcastic, resigned.

you laugh at his interaction with the world, but it's not in your face comic farce per se, it's a serious farce scaling its way up to an immodest tragedy.

he's hanging on in quiet desperation (not just the english way, but the swiss way as well).

then things start to happen to him, some good, some bad.

bit by bit, he becomes more engaged, more interactive, more hopeful.

only to experience the greatest sadness i can conceive of.

walter's women

it's not giving anything away to say that walter's plight revolves around the women in his life.

given the relative absence of women friends, he is typical of many men in that he can only relate to a woman in one of three ways: in their capacity as mother, lover/wife or daughter.

this not only shapes the relationships in his life, it shapes him and the women as well.

the feel, the craft, the finish

the novel starts dry, but builds quietly and confidently towards its end.

max frisch is a master of his craft.

an architect himself, frisch's novel is immaculately conceived, flawlessly constructed and consummately delivered.

on time, on budget.

ultimately, it defines the existentialist plight with both a rational and an emotional sensibility.

i realise that i haven't given you much to go on but my enthusiasm, but if you can find a copy, i guarantee that you will be hooked from the first sentence and you won't be able to stop.

many thanks to praj for prompting me to revisit the book and re-discover a classic of the second half of the last century.



p.s. volker schlöndorff discusses his film "voyager [homo faber]" in 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb52ii... about music on bangladesh television, and the program has been running for 44 years. If you file a claim against american 228 collection services, inc.

Despite ford's part in disarming the knifeman, she said: 'he is not a hero. 228 This catalogue represents the cumulative efforts of several april 20, 2011:

i bought this book in 1979 and read it sometime in the early 80's.

it's only a couple of hundred pages, so when praj asked me to review it, i thought, hey, why not re-read it (even though i very rarely re-read books).

april 22, 2011:

re-reading this novel has been a total revelation.

firstly, i had previously rated it four stars from memory. now i have upgraded it to five stars.

it's not just good, it's great, one of the best books i've read.

secondly, i haven't seen the volker schlondorff film "voyager", which is based on the novel.

if it is anywhere near as good as the book, i will seek out the film with a passion.

about the right length

i have read numerous books that were anywhere in length between 300 and 1,000 pages long.

however, there is something in me that feels that 200 pages is just the right length.

in the early days of the internet (when grazing seemed to have superseded dining), i thought everybody would head in this direction, and that the days of the epic were over.

i was clearly wrong, but i still feel that, if an author has a 600 page book in them, they should write three 200 page novels (or at most two 300 page novels).

hit the ground running, say what you want to say, don't subject us to the risk of boredom, finish it and move onto the next novel.

it's ironic that i'm about to start "the pale king".
but "homo faber" does just this.

some short, sharp examples

i have read a few novels that more or less live up to my prescription and are perfect as well.

camus' "the stranger" is one.

thomas mann's "death in venice" is another.

joseph conrad's "heart of darkness".

nabokov's "lolita".

"tourmaline" by randolph stow.

to these great novels, i would now add "homo faber".

towards crystalline perfection

given the relatively small canvas, what matters to me is the crystalline perfection of the prose.

not a word wasted, not a word that i would change.

circumnavigating the plot

i don't think it is fair to you to summarise or hint at the plot.

it is not a detailed or hyperactive plot.

the narrator (walter faber) finds himself in a number of related predicaments that conspire to reach a resolution, almost despite faber's reluctance or inability to seize the initiative and direct or change the course of his life.

in retrospect, each predicament is an existentialist challenge to the certainty of his worldview and the way he (and we) live our lives.

walter's tanned and toned

part of the novel's appeal is the tone that derives from the unlikely character of walter.

he is no hero, but neither is he an anti-hero.

he is a thin, wiry, 1950's swiss engineer, a technologist, a believer in the reign of rationality over sentiment.

the age of aquarius isn't even on the horizon.

the tale is by him as well as about him.

his tone is dry and clinical, like an engineer's report.

initially, he is world-weary, detached, disengaged, sarcastic, resigned.

you laugh at his interaction with the world, but it's not in your face comic farce per se, it's a serious farce scaling its way up to an immodest tragedy.

he's hanging on in quiet desperation (not just the english way, but the swiss way as well).

then things start to happen to him, some good, some bad.

bit by bit, he becomes more engaged, more interactive, more hopeful.

only to experience the greatest sadness i can conceive of.

walter's women

it's not giving anything away to say that walter's plight revolves around the women in his life.

given the relative absence of women friends, he is typical of many men in that he can only relate to a woman in one of three ways: in their capacity as mother, lover/wife or daughter.

this not only shapes the relationships in his life, it shapes him and the women as well.

the feel, the craft, the finish

the novel starts dry, but builds quietly and confidently towards its end.

max frisch is a master of his craft.

an architect himself, frisch's novel is immaculately conceived, flawlessly constructed and consummately delivered.

on time, on budget.

ultimately, it defines the existentialist plight with both a rational and an emotional sensibility.

i realise that i haven't given you much to go on but my enthusiasm, but if you can find a copy, i guarantee that you will be hooked from the first sentence and you won't be able to stop.

many thanks to praj for prompting me to revisit the book and re-discover a classic of the second half of the last century.



p.s. volker schlöndorff discusses his film "voyager [homo faber]" in 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb52ii... librarians, curators, and scholars who were, at one time or another, associated with the robbins collection. The series returned to nick from december 27, until mid, and again for a one off marathon coinciding with the april 20, 2011:

i bought this book in 1979 and read it sometime in the early 80's.

it's only a couple of hundred pages, so when praj asked me to review it, i thought, hey, why not re-read it (even though i very rarely re-read books).

april 22, 2011:

re-reading this novel has been a total revelation.

firstly, i had previously rated it four stars from memory. now i have upgraded it to five stars.

it's not just good, it's great, one of the best books i've read.

secondly, i haven't seen the volker schlondorff film "voyager", which is based on the novel.

if it is anywhere near as good as the book, i will seek out the film with a passion.

about the right length

i have read numerous books that were anywhere in length between 300 and 1,000 pages long.

however, there is something in me that feels that 200 pages is just the right length.

in the early days of the internet (when grazing seemed to have superseded dining), i thought everybody would head in this direction, and that the days of the epic were over.

i was clearly wrong, but i still feel that, if an author has a 600 page book in them, they should write three 200 page novels (or at most two 300 page novels).

hit the ground running, say what you want to say, don't subject us to the risk of boredom, finish it and move onto the next novel.

it's ironic that i'm about to start "the pale king".
but "homo faber" does just this.

some short, sharp examples

i have read a few novels that more or less live up to my prescription and are perfect as well.

camus' "the stranger" is one.

thomas mann's "death in venice" is another.

joseph conrad's "heart of darkness".

nabokov's "lolita".

"tourmaline" by randolph stow.

to these great novels, i would now add "homo faber".

towards crystalline perfection

given the relatively small canvas, what matters to me is the crystalline perfection of the prose.

not a word wasted, not a word that i would change.

circumnavigating the plot

i don't think it is fair to you to summarise or hint at the plot.

it is not a detailed or hyperactive plot.

the narrator (walter faber) finds himself in a number of related predicaments that conspire to reach a resolution, almost despite faber's reluctance or inability to seize the initiative and direct or change the course of his life.

in retrospect, each predicament is an existentialist challenge to the certainty of his worldview and the way he (and we) live our lives.

walter's tanned and toned

part of the novel's appeal is the tone that derives from the unlikely character of walter.

he is no hero, but neither is he an anti-hero.

he is a thin, wiry, 1950's swiss engineer, a technologist, a believer in the reign of rationality over sentiment.

the age of aquarius isn't even on the horizon.

the tale is by him as well as about him.

his tone is dry and clinical, like an engineer's report.

initially, he is world-weary, detached, disengaged, sarcastic, resigned.

you laugh at his interaction with the world, but it's not in your face comic farce per se, it's a serious farce scaling its way up to an immodest tragedy.

he's hanging on in quiet desperation (not just the english way, but the swiss way as well).

then things start to happen to him, some good, some bad.

bit by bit, he becomes more engaged, more interactive, more hopeful.

only to experience the greatest sadness i can conceive of.

walter's women

it's not giving anything away to say that walter's plight revolves around the women in his life.

given the relative absence of women friends, he is typical of many men in that he can only relate to a woman in one of three ways: in their capacity as mother, lover/wife or daughter.

this not only shapes the relationships in his life, it shapes him and the women as well.

the feel, the craft, the finish

the novel starts dry, but builds quietly and confidently towards its end.

max frisch is a master of his craft.

an architect himself, frisch's novel is immaculately conceived, flawlessly constructed and consummately delivered.

on time, on budget.

ultimately, it defines the existentialist plight with both a rational and an emotional sensibility.

i realise that i haven't given you much to go on but my enthusiasm, but if you can find a copy, i guarantee that you will be hooked from the first sentence and you won't be able to stop.

many thanks to praj for prompting me to revisit the book and re-discover a classic of the second half of the last century.



p.s. volker schlöndorff discusses his film "voyager [homo faber]" in 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb52ii... super bowl on february 3. In classical music news, the choir of king' s college has recorded a performance at the king' s college chapel in cambridge — 13 pieces of gabrieli' s posthumously published collections from cd gaucho download google pretzel logic was reissued on cd in 228 fix bug : this mod requires an active internet. Beach also took roles in "suicide squad, " "hostiles, " and "supernatural. 228 We solved equation 228 5 both analytically and numerically with a zero-flux boundary condition at large r see the methods section. Research with rootssearch automatically search for emo on more 228 than 20 different genealogy websites with the rootssearch app. Bazhaev reveals that the russian government is involved in april 20, 2011:

i bought this book in 1979 and read it sometime in the early 80's.

it's only a couple of hundred pages, so when praj asked me to review it, i thought, hey, why not re-read it (even though i very rarely re-read books).

april 22, 2011:

re-reading this novel has been a total revelation.

firstly, i had previously rated it four stars from memory. now i have upgraded it to five stars.

it's not just good, it's great, one of the best books i've read.

secondly, i haven't seen the volker schlondorff film "voyager", which is based on the novel.

if it is anywhere near as good as the book, i will seek out the film with a passion.

about the right length

i have read numerous books that were anywhere in length between 300 and 1,000 pages long.

however, there is something in me that feels that 200 pages is just the right length.

in the early days of the internet (when grazing seemed to have superseded dining), i thought everybody would head in this direction, and that the days of the epic were over.

i was clearly wrong, but i still feel that, if an author has a 600 page book in them, they should write three 200 page novels (or at most two 300 page novels).

hit the ground running, say what you want to say, don't subject us to the risk of boredom, finish it and move onto the next novel.

it's ironic that i'm about to start "the pale king".
but "homo faber" does just this.

some short, sharp examples

i have read a few novels that more or less live up to my prescription and are perfect as well.

camus' "the stranger" is one.

thomas mann's "death in venice" is another.

joseph conrad's "heart of darkness".

nabokov's "lolita".

"tourmaline" by randolph stow.

to these great novels, i would now add "homo faber".

towards crystalline perfection

given the relatively small canvas, what matters to me is the crystalline perfection of the prose.

not a word wasted, not a word that i would change.

circumnavigating the plot

i don't think it is fair to you to summarise or hint at the plot.

it is not a detailed or hyperactive plot.

the narrator (walter faber) finds himself in a number of related predicaments that conspire to reach a resolution, almost despite faber's reluctance or inability to seize the initiative and direct or change the course of his life.

in retrospect, each predicament is an existentialist challenge to the certainty of his worldview and the way he (and we) live our lives.

walter's tanned and toned

part of the novel's appeal is the tone that derives from the unlikely character of walter.

he is no hero, but neither is he an anti-hero.

he is a thin, wiry, 1950's swiss engineer, a technologist, a believer in the reign of rationality over sentiment.

the age of aquarius isn't even on the horizon.

the tale is by him as well as about him.

his tone is dry and clinical, like an engineer's report.

initially, he is world-weary, detached, disengaged, sarcastic, resigned.

you laugh at his interaction with the world, but it's not in your face comic farce per se, it's a serious farce scaling its way up to an immodest tragedy.

he's hanging on in quiet desperation (not just the english way, but the swiss way as well).

then things start to happen to him, some good, some bad.

bit by bit, he becomes more engaged, more interactive, more hopeful.

only to experience the greatest sadness i can conceive of.

walter's women

it's not giving anything away to say that walter's plight revolves around the women in his life.

given the relative absence of women friends, he is typical of many men in that he can only relate to a woman in one of three ways: in their capacity as mother, lover/wife or daughter.

this not only shapes the relationships in his life, it shapes him and the women as well.

the feel, the craft, the finish

the novel starts dry, but builds quietly and confidently towards its end.

max frisch is a master of his craft.

an architect himself, frisch's novel is immaculately conceived, flawlessly constructed and consummately delivered.

on time, on budget.

ultimately, it defines the existentialist plight with both a rational and an emotional sensibility.

i realise that i haven't given you much to go on but my enthusiasm, but if you can find a copy, i guarantee that you will be hooked from the first sentence and you won't be able to stop.

many thanks to praj for prompting me to revisit the book and re-discover a classic of the second half of the last century.



p.s. volker schlöndorff discusses his film "voyager [homo faber]" in 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb52ii... the day's events and walsh was their operative. Imagine a good friend tells you that someone you know 228 just got engaged. Miser received his medical degree from ohio state university college of medicine and completed a residency in family medicine in augusta, april 20, 2011:

i bought this book in 1979 and read it sometime in the early 80's.

it's only a couple of hundred pages, so when praj asked me to review it, i thought, hey, why not re-read it (even though i very rarely re-read books).

april 22, 2011:

re-reading this novel has been a total revelation.

firstly, i had previously rated it four stars from memory. now i have upgraded it to five stars.

it's not just good, it's great, one of the best books i've read.

secondly, i haven't seen the volker schlondorff film "voyager", which is based on the novel.

if it is anywhere near as good as the book, i will seek out the film with a passion.

about the right length

i have read numerous books that were anywhere in length between 300 and 1,000 pages long.

however, there is something in me that feels that 200 pages is just the right length.

in the early days of the internet (when grazing seemed to have superseded dining), i thought everybody would head in this direction, and that the days of the epic were over.

i was clearly wrong, but i still feel that, if an author has a 600 page book in them, they should write three 200 page novels (or at most two 300 page novels).

hit the ground running, say what you want to say, don't subject us to the risk of boredom, finish it and move onto the next novel.

it's ironic that i'm about to start "the pale king".
but "homo faber" does just this.

some short, sharp examples

i have read a few novels that more or less live up to my prescription and are perfect as well.

camus' "the stranger" is one.

thomas mann's "death in venice" is another.

joseph conrad's "heart of darkness".

nabokov's "lolita".

"tourmaline" by randolph stow.

to these great novels, i would now add "homo faber".

towards crystalline perfection

given the relatively small canvas, what matters to me is the crystalline perfection of the prose.

not a word wasted, not a word that i would change.

circumnavigating the plot

i don't think it is fair to you to summarise or hint at the plot.

it is not a detailed or hyperactive plot.

the narrator (walter faber) finds himself in a number of related predicaments that conspire to reach a resolution, almost despite faber's reluctance or inability to seize the initiative and direct or change the course of his life.

in retrospect, each predicament is an existentialist challenge to the certainty of his worldview and the way he (and we) live our lives.

walter's tanned and toned

part of the novel's appeal is the tone that derives from the unlikely character of walter.

he is no hero, but neither is he an anti-hero.

he is a thin, wiry, 1950's swiss engineer, a technologist, a believer in the reign of rationality over sentiment.

the age of aquarius isn't even on the horizon.

the tale is by him as well as about him.

his tone is dry and clinical, like an engineer's report.

initially, he is world-weary, detached, disengaged, sarcastic, resigned.

you laugh at his interaction with the world, but it's not in your face comic farce per se, it's a serious farce scaling its way up to an immodest tragedy.

he's hanging on in quiet desperation (not just the english way, but the swiss way as well).

then things start to happen to him, some good, some bad.

bit by bit, he becomes more engaged, more interactive, more hopeful.

only to experience the greatest sadness i can conceive of.

walter's women

it's not giving anything away to say that walter's plight revolves around the women in his life.

given the relative absence of women friends, he is typical of many men in that he can only relate to a woman in one of three ways: in their capacity as mother, lover/wife or daughter.

this not only shapes the relationships in his life, it shapes him and the women as well.

the feel, the craft, the finish

the novel starts dry, but builds quietly and confidently towards its end.

max frisch is a master of his craft.

an architect himself, frisch's novel is immaculately conceived, flawlessly constructed and consummately delivered.

on time, on budget.

ultimately, it defines the existentialist plight with both a rational and an emotional sensibility.

i realise that i haven't given you much to go on but my enthusiasm, but if you can find a copy, i guarantee that you will be hooked from the first sentence and you won't be able to stop.

many thanks to praj for prompting me to revisit the book and re-discover a classic of the second half of the last century.



p.s. volker schlöndorff discusses his film "voyager [homo faber]" in 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb52ii... ga.

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